10 Best kerosene lamp of 2020

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Kerosene lamp guide

The inventor of kerosene lamp

Jan Jozef Ignacy Lukasiewicz (1822-1882) is considered the inventor of kerosene lamp and is still one of the pioneers of European oil production. The chemist and pharmacist from Lemberg, Poland, carried out numerous pharmaceutical investigations on crude oil in 1852. He used a raw material from regional septic tanks and realized that petroleum proved to be a cheap alternative to whale oil. Previously, the Canadian Abraham Gesner had developed a distillation process for the production of petroleum. Lukasiewicz used the procedure with his colleague Jan Zeh. The first attempts that new lamp oilto ignite was not successful. But the two did not give up until 1853 the prototype of a kerosene lamp had arisen. The tinsmith Adam Bratkowski helped construct the lamp.
Soon Lukasiewicz was called to a hospital to donate light to his invention for an appendectomy. Inspired by the brightness, the hospital was one of the first customers to have several lampsand ordered 500 liters of petroleum oil.
In the same year Lukasiewicz and Jan filed for patents with the imperial governor in Lviv on the firing process. The lamp itself was never patented. Local dealers took over the marketing of the product. Due to the increased demand, they were soon manufactured worldwide at various locations. The first street lighting with kerosene lamps has been around since 1854.

The technical development of kerosene lamp
The light of a kerosene lamp is created by combustion of petroleum gases. Its principle was derived from oil lamps in the 19th century. The whale oil used hitherto gave only a low yield of light. A strong smell was uncomfortable, as well as the development of smoke and soot during combustion.
Lukasewicz invented in 1853 the matching Runddocht the kerosene lamp. In the distillation of petroleum he had discovered that the low-viscosity kerosene had a different flow (viscosity) and could rise more quickly on a wick of more than 10 centimeters in length. In addition, petroleum oil proved to be cheaper than other fuels used.
Petroleum is a liquid mixture of hydrocarbons. At a flashpoint that is below 55 degrees Celsius, it burns smoother, brighter, and cleaner. It is much safer than today’s gasoline for cars or planes. At the beginning of the 20th century, kerosene lamps were replaced by electric light. Petroleum is still used today as a cleaner and solvent, as well as a fuel for model airplanes.

The technical details of the various kerosene lamps
Wick or draft lamps contain a burner. The cosmos burner of the Berlin company Wild & Wessel was patented in 1865. They are the most commonly built burners, where above a shallow and wide wick converges. The round woven and hollow wick allows combustion air to be supplied from inside and outside. So the combustion is odorless, cleaner and brighter. Until 1980 Kokosbrenner were used as wagon and signal lamps of the German Reichsbahn.

The first glass cylinders were developed in 1810 in the Rhineland. They look similar to one fireplaceand protect against wind. Each burner requires its own glass cylinder. The flat burner includes a Viennese cylinder. The cosmos burner is equipped with a Cosmos cylinder. The Matador cylinder is used with a flame disc burner.
The wick width is also standardized according to the lamp type. For a cosmos burner, it is 42 millimeters with a screw thread of 28 millimeters in diameter.
To increase the brightness, a flame washer was used. This requires a glass cylinder with a spherical bulge. The strength of the resulting brightness is impressive. The disadvantage, however, is the strong heat and the immense consumption of petroleum, so that these lamps were found only in rich households.
Until the end of the 70s there were construction lamps with flat wick burners. They had a large tank, which allowed a burning time of over 70 hours. These hurricane lampappeared under the name „Feuerhand 276“ of the West Berlin company Nier. In East Germany it was the brands BAT and Frowo.
The petroleum incandescent lamps are a combination of high-power and wick lamps, whose brightness corresponds to a 50-watt light bulb. With the help of a wick, the petroleum is taken from a tank. It burns in a blue flame that supplies a mantle with heat and gas. The lamp type Aladdin No. 23 is still being built. They are optionally operated with gasoline or spirit.

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*Last update on 2020-11-04 / Affiliate links(we get a commission when you buy on amazon) / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API