10 Best Sambuca of 2020

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

No products found.

[wwp_vc_breadcrumbs_dynamic show_home=”1″ show_parent=”1″ show_child=”1″ theme=”0″]

No products found.

Sambuca Guide

The colorless liqueur Sambuca For many people it is inextricably linked with the Italian way of life. It is made from anise and often contains distillates of star anise, green anise, licorice and other spices. The alcohol content of Sambuca is between 38 and 42 percent by volume and at 350 g / liter it has a comparatively high sugar content. Most of the liqueur is drunk as digestif.

History of Sambuca

In the Middle Ages, Syrian traders brought herbs, spices and a liqueur made of anise to Italy. This predecessor of Sambuca was originally consumed as a medicine, but quickly found as a treat drink many supporters. The first Sambuca Originally from Lazio, a region in central Italy around the capital Rome. There are different theories for the etymological origin of the name. For example, it is believed that the name Sambuca could be derived from the Italian word „sambuco“ (elderberry), but this is doubted by others as elderberry is not always included. Also common is the assumption that the name goes back to the name „Sambuco“, as in Italy the ships of the Syrian traders were called. In 1982, the Catholic Church published a letter from Luigi Manzi (1809-1873), one of the founding fathers of today’s Sambuca. There he mentioned that the name of his „Sambuca di Manzi“ liqueur, launched in 1851, derives from a water and anise refreshment drink (Sambuchelli) that was popular at that time. However, the explanation of the origin of the name is ultimately not clear.

Worth knowing about enjoyment & well-known manufacturers

Usually Sambuca is drunk in the variant „con la mosca“ (with fly). There are three coffee beansSambuca is added to the sambuca, which is eaten with a bitter taste that balances the sweetness of the liqueur. This is based on a legend told by an elderly lady whose glass had always been three flies, attracted by the sweetness of the liqueur. Often the liquor is also flambéed, but flambéing is rather uncommon in Italy and is practiced mostly outside the country of origin of Sambuca. When Sambuca is diluted with water or cooled with ice, the Louche effect gives experienced connoisseurs information about the aniseed content of the liqueur. This can be recognized by the turbidity that results from a particular mixing ratio – the higher the level of anise, the cloudier the beverage. Among the world’s leading manufacturers of Sambuca is the company Molinari from Italy. The entrepreneur Angelo Molinari, born in Rome in 1893, had a bar in Ethiopia as a young man, in which he experimented with various spirits. After his return to Italy, he created the Sambuca Civitavecchia from green anise in the 1930s. Later, he refined the recipe and launched the Sambuca with star anise, which is being sold by Molinari to the present day with great success all over the world. Other manufacturers of Sambuca include Ramazotti, Marsina, Casoni and Barnetti. In addition to the more well-known brands, there are also a large number of smaller producers in Italy, which are often found in the region around the regional capital of Rome.

[relatedYouTubeVideos relation=”keywords” terms=”Sambuca” max=”1″]

*Last update on 2020-11-04 / Affiliate links(we get a commission when you buy on amazon) / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API